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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
produce 50 of the out put and people are driving in the economy but economic stagnation and federal gridlock are skooegz the federal government service. add in the pressures of rooirz temperatures and the countries face to daunting channels. urban america needs a new playbook and we'll take a look at that. we have 3 guests mayor ed lee. and the president of the urban management one of the countries largest home bindles and a co- author of how the city's are fixing our fragile developed. please welcome them to planet one. (clapping). thank you gentlemen all for coming. bruce cats let begin with you. we'll get down to some specification. you write that the great recession was a rude way. call thrills about that. first of all, that you for letting me be here. i think what led to the great recession was a miss guided growth model which basically said we can grow an economy consumed by department and focus on the meveng around homebuilding but the funds would tells us we need to grow an economy and debris i quite frankly as president in the region it's fueled by ideas and manufacturing
the economy as a whole. this is the van ignore of the industrial reluctance we want to be at the head of it. we talk about portland. portland actually doubled exports in - >> in san francisco we don't think of that (laughter). >> i'm sure how san francisco would respond to that we're weirder but portland is betting on a because they were so smart at the metropolitan scale a tear down the freeway in the 70s they've attracted a lot of firms t 3 sell services. their brand is we build green cities. they're saying to the latin medical examiner cities you can break out and we can help you plan and supply those products. we innovative in the economy while export those services and products good jobs and a very different model. you know, i think we need to get beyond labels. the most of come out of washington, d.c. they're mostly ideological about what the economy is. we're mapped it, it's productive and cities will get about the business of developing fuels >> i want to follow up on cars you note in 1983 half of the americans have driver's license and only 29 percent today perhaps more cities
side and what it does it our economy and families and our community and i've seen the incredible force that enterprises bring to revitalize our community and to hire talent from within and aboard. i've seen great entrepreneurship by welcoming talented folks from aboard so reforming the immigration system i hope i'll get a chance to be part of it. and we're looking forward to putting together a team and rolling out the historic reform of that system >> thank you for this conversation. >> thank you to our san francisco chamber of commerce and business forward and sf city for co- hosting this town hall. i'm eager to hear from the other companies about their stories of immigration. tell us your own stories. we're to start with you the ceo of illuminate. >> so my story is not any more special then the stories of what you've heard. you group in india. i gave a shout out and my family really believes in education and the empowerment through education. there is a certain resistlessness and get out of your comfort zone and explore other things. that's how i got here. the path is not easy it's
right. mayor ed lee has worked hard to keep san francisco economy and recovery on track and create jobs for san franciscans. he makes a city like san francisco to celebrate diversity in education and health care and in the environment for future generation. mayor ed lee began his career as a civil rights attorney he later served as a director of the human rights commission fighting for people then as director of the public works and later as city administrator now as mayor of san francisco he continues to fight by implementing services that help our most vulnerable community. i'd like to welcome to the stage the houshlg may have san francisco mayor ed lee. (clapping.) >> thank you very much. good evening, everybody and welcome to the people's palace. well, this is tonight i'm excited to be here it's an honor to be here to celebrate the ninth american heritage indian month no san francisco celebration of the awards. i wanted to thank not that all of you are here but for k q e d for the sponsoring of local heros. this is important because your city is all about diversity and i want to ma
hundred in sf. we're committed to growing the local economy and maintaining a strong connection to our san francisco lines. when looking for a new headquarters it was location, location, location. we needed somewhere to provide easy access to lots of local businesses and restaurants and remain convenient for mass transit riders and bike riders a lot of our employees ride bikes. combrem is pack at about local plays and celebrate the distinct active and unique. we want to have this into a more than workplace. talking of resident at the 130 montgomery is an important milestone. we'll celebrate our tenth anniversary next year. i'm privileged to introduce yelp leader our 2kwishd nancy pelosi (clapping.) and what on a honor to be your representative in congress. thank you jeremy. your leadership and your sense of community and for staying in san francisco. i'm honored to join you and your colleagues especially our mayor who has a relationship with this part of the whole city, of course, but this was his baby and he's done a remarkable job. when we cut relishes at another that i have i tip my hat
collective plan to have a thriving economy. we share best practices and collaborate to educate the public. and we've realized on many of you who are in the audience. let's get back to where i started people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world do we have them here from leader nancy pelosi who has been protecting the environment to mayor ed lee who is building the extension programs who has helped to there our focuses and effectiveness and strengthen our role 90 in government and the architect is being trormd. we should all take heart from their transformational change. we've shown we can continue our focus to our values we'll indeed have an impact on the federal government in the lives of the american people and hopefully on the world stage where america continues to lead. now we have a woman who needs little introduction nancy pelosi is the representative for the one hundred and 31st congress reforming the political system to create clean campaigns and concocting reforms and slurring the neighborhoods and scalds. from 2007 to 2011 she served in the house of representat
time. the point i was making, people were terrified. because it seemed like the economy had no bottom and the banks were going down and there was no federal deposit dollars. so imagine a time when we actually had a president who told us we should be courageous rather than trafficked in fear. to his own advantage. there's been a long war on the new deal. it was when roosevelt got started. almost immediately, the more than great realized the lengths he was willing to go. at the beginning, roosevelt didn't understand how far he was going to go. the dupont family and the ones that set up the american liberty league. that was successful because they have unlimited amounts of money. there were so popular, they were not able to stop it. they began to finance right-wing think tanks. they have been successful to the university of chicago economics department and notable fraud such as milton freed man. the idea of neoliberalism is there should be massive, selective tax cuts. margaret thatcher it is there is no alternative. of course that's absurd. there was an alternative. we have to connect th
. third this has big impacts on our economy. it will prove the transportation and health insurance this is a home to oakland. it will continue to serve as a place for folks on the other side of the bay. it's the toll payers who fund this. so we have to give our toll payers a round of sport for this measure (clapping) >> finally i'm so glad with the addition of bike and pedestrian lanes we're moving closer to an integrated mode of transportation that is good for our environment and community. so in closings thank you to everyone in our efforts and it's been eagerly awaited. i've been in the senate and the assembly n for 15 years so i've eagerly awaited this day. rest assured i'll continue to be an advocate in congress even in this is this tough environment for transportation infrastructure. i wish you the best of lick and a very happy labor day. thank you. again (clapping) >> knoll let me introduce our tremendous leader in the california state senate darryl stein beggar. >> good afternoon to leaders from the bay area. when i hear people talk about this bridge and today's events
areas. man: we have to have water supply for health purposes, for fire protection, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but t
to have full prarngs in our economy >> the president has said it allowed and clear he believed that our immigration system is broken. he has laid obvious his ideas. he believes we need a strong bored and it's a priority for his administration a fair path to censorship[p to the millions of people who are contributing to our country and need to be here and have a lot to continue to contribute when they come out of the shadows. there are other priorities that he will continue to support and push forward. we want to, you know, look at those employers that are not following the rules. like all in this room there are employers who are not following the rules and it's a priority for our wanting to stop the things that are making us weak. and we still have a few years ahead but at this point it's not the end of the world but the administration stays commented to fix this system >> we're not going to lose because if we lose this opportunities it will be decades. but bob thanks for that question >> yeah. i have more of a city observation. as this effort moves from the senate to the house that'
, small businesses in this difficult economy. >> there are a lot of vacant storefronts, so we are trying to find people to read these spaces. there is a bookstore over there. this way there are a lot of businesses that have been closing. >> i support the small businesses versus more chain stores that seem to be coming in to some of the vacant storefronts. i am trying to be sensitive to the local merchants because they make up the unique character and diversity of our neighborhoods. you go to lafayette. i was just there reading to a bunch of kids. i think i was reading to fifth graders. what grade are you in? >> as a member of the school board, i know strong schools in the richmond is key. also, from the birth to 5 commission -- each commission has an organization to oversee pre-kindergarten kids. i want to ensure that the state level that we advocate strong support for young children and their families, good parenting support as well. >> often, we have to govern with our hearts. 80,000 people in the richmond district sometimes have different needs than people in the mission district or b
in today's economy. so tell me how bad they had if in the authorizes o 30s pr that's the old bridge and the new bridge. we're in oakland and it's fitting and a proper the first elected official is the chief of oakland. jean acquainting is one of my bosses so i'm sure her remarks will be excellent (clapping) >> and so welcome to oakland. (clapping). >> you know when i became mayor, i said oakland is a city of dreams. it's been the city of dreams since the trans conditional railroad ended and thousand of cabinets would arrive every week. it's become the city of dreams base it's the place that immigrants can afford to live and one-hundred plus languages are spoken here. in many ways this bridge was a dream of some people. and like most things in oakland it has not been easy. we have very difficult political and economic and other hurdles h that when we ail come tooth are not the results beautiful. isn't it really beautiful? so he texted the other mayor of oakland governor brown today and said we're sorry you're not here. for many of you who follow the fights he said he had an elegant
proudly, because, without wastewater infrastructure and drinking water infrastructure, the economy will stop. we did a major outreach. we trained an outreach team, who went to every community meeting, to educate people on how bad the crisis was. not only did i tell people that we'd have to raise rates, i told them we'd have to tear up the city to repair this infrastructure. man: you can't simply say, "i won't use any water, it's too expensive." we have about 25% of our population that's at or below the poverty line, so you have to look at rate structures that are tiered so the people can pay their bills. franklin: we would love to have something like 75% federal money. we do get some federal aid and we are thankful, but on the other hand, we're paying for this primarily with new rates. we have increased our rates to among the highest in america. but not nearly as much as if we hadn't passed a one-cent sales tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters t
economy a strong. and we do want to have success for everyone in the city. and everybody in some way including the kids in my family all touched muni in one way so it's a major transit mode we want to support and when it comes to saves they have to be a safe place for everyone. thank you to all the offered and the people and the entire safety compliment that works directly with metropolitan and as well as our police department. only on a day to day basis but they've been there with our officers to supplement all that the muni needs to do. we've invested in the improvement of our public safety. this summer as you heard chief and i and others in the technology world in the city likewise our officers to save time and allowing them to use smart phones that are connected no to the system that our attorney general has. we also invested in the community ambassador program to get them trained. those are residents of people that live in the tenderloin south of market in the bay view or vigilance valley they're walking the streets they can be the additional eyes and areas working with our poli
, understand your business, talk to them as you are growing your business. when the economy is strong, all lenders are shopping for transactions. in times are tough on credit, you want to rely on those deeper liberation ships with your lender. you want to develop a relationship with a lender. it is the case where you want to open up an account, while to have another bank services that you want to have a relationship with your lender with it because when you go to them for any loan requests, you want them to know about your business and feel like they are a partner of yours, not just that you are shopping them. if you are shopping, you are just looking for the best deal from them, rather than a long- term relationship. >> i want to thank everyone for coming. hopefully, you have all signed up for our updates. we are going to be hosting these on a regular basis. the next two coming up will focus on becoming a government contractor, how your small business can partner with the government. the next one will also be on how to grain your business, with tax -- green your business, tax credits ava
health division they thought deeply about the vision. our vision survived the economy it survived economic and jerry channels and by the way, a restructuring the health care nationally. here we are going i think we can agree that our original vision has triumphed. our housing is linked for people who have faced chronic homelessness it's hard to and difficult to achieve this without health care and other supportive services by putting those together the building is living evidence of the critical sunny between those two. many of us have long been proponents since the housing improvements. we've known the benefit of lincoln housing and verifies. and so this this building it's a statement of how far we've come and can go. the clinic is open and spacious and green. the design of the instantly matches the care that's provided here. it's a welcoming respectful place and it offers a place for people who don't often have access for enough space. four us it's been an honor to participate. finally, the two associations are committed to continue the improvement in this neighborhood for the b
and democrats are going fight hard to keep their agenda and restart our economy, and there will be more work to be done. i would like to hand over the podium to nicole rivera, who put this together. she will introduce the panelists and go over some logistics. i want to point out quickly that we are being recorded by san francisco government tv. the camera in front is only aimed at the podium. it is not taking shots of the audience, only the podium for people who want to ask questions. so do not worry, you are not on tv if you do not want to be. >> thank you for your patience. i am a representative with leader pelosi, and i'm thrilled to have you today to learn more of our best practices for accessing credit. it is a priority for our office. we are very well aware of how small businesses are running up against the wall right now in terms of trying to get the credit and loans they are looking for, so i will try hard to bring the brightest minds in this room so you can effectively fix their range and learn more about what you can do better to fix your business plan and what it is they are looki
's not the driver of the economy in the future. and so that proposal as can you see in the southern part of the southern part of the map was changing the zoning to zoning conditions that allow housing and allow office jobs or other kinds of commercial uses. the build form in soma is not like downtown. buildings are less tall and have more girth, if you will. and so that is kind of what we're trying to replicate in the neighborhood. you can see the height nodes from the map and mostly along the transit stations, but otherwise, we're expecting the support of bigger buildings and is that possible because of the large parcels that reflect its historical industrial nature. finally let's speak to what the build-out could be? so there is already a lot of uses on the ground today. we have a 700 houses unitss and 50,000 jobs in the neighborhood. and just to talk about jobs for a second, the real impetus of this plan is to support job growth. we have done a lot of planning in the planning department for the last ten years for housing. the housing market is in demand all over san francisco. there
and 20 percent of the people produce 50 of the out put and people are driving in the economy but economic stagnation and federal
with machinery. we see that in the economy so i want to talk with you before bruce because the institute has been supportive of that research that is replacing humans with machinery >> thank you bruce cats. >> well, we've about that here before there are disrush active technologies in the past where it will dmich employment so i don't want to by any stretch want to talk about rofbdz for certain kinds of work but if we focus as the mayor and a connie has focused about a very different kind of committee that's productive and innovative that's resilient; right? and we begin to talk about some of those issues like the shift to 0 lower carbon economy as giving cities and metz the first advantage i don't think we should be overly worried or concerned about this technical innovation and we went off course for a very long time by this is our wake up call this is the moment we need to understand what assets and advantages we have in the world and we need to max maximum misses their opportunity. if we can stay on that focus i think we can make up the jobs deficit about 10 million jobs in the country we c
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)